Category Archives: fitness

StrongFirst.com Training program template

Craig Marker over at StrongFirst recently wrote a great article about training for their certifications, SFG1 and SFG2.  This group is very well researched and has had lots of success training individuals.  I listen to them and experiment.  As you may know, I enjoy Paval Tsatsouline’s work and StrongFirst has been his most recent project.  Anyway, the article describes cardio training methods for passing the snatch test for their certifications (100 snatches in 5 minutes with a certain bell) and a kettlebell pressing program which will allow you to press bigger bells.  It is based off of Russian training protocols that allowed strength to be gained and maintained for a long, long time.

This article is written with an eye towards kettlebell training but it can be used for any modality.  I have recently pursued strength training through the barbell after achieving 1/2 bodyweight kettlebell press on each side.  In January I am moving to a mixed training modality of kettlebells, barbell, running, and cycling.  I love simplicity and minimalism.  I prefer to minimize equipment use.Ie…I like the idea of a weight, you, the gound and effort. If you want to press something overhead, get it from the ground and put it overhead. Therefore I am going to be training the kb getup, overhead press with the kettlebell, the floor press with a barbell, the zercher squat (barbell), and of course the barbell deadlift.

Now to the point.  I have been using training cycles for beginners as described by Marty Gallagher, Pavel Tsatsouline, and Mark Rippetoe.  After running into this Craig Marker program I have decided to use it over the next year to improve my lifts further while not burning myself out.  In order to simplify the training I decided to create an excel spreadsheet so that I could simply add in my current max and the program would quickly calculate the percentages throughout the program.

Excel – Strongfirst Strength Template 45lb bar- Wave.xlsx

Excel – Strongfirst cardio.xlsx

Note that the cardio is suggested upwards of 30 minutes in the article, I kept it at six weeks so that the two programs would be of similar length.

I am thinking about adding two weeks prior to this cycle. They would be for speed work. I would increase from 40 percent to 60 percent over the two weeks period. This would also allow you to run this program 6 times a year with 4 weeks off for recovery, vacation or life in general. 

What are your thoughts on this?

These templates are based upon a 45 pound standard bar.  My wife and I are going to be training together.  Due to this I will be creating spreadsheets for barbells of other weights.  

I hope you all find StrongFirst, check them out, and enjoy these templates.

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America Diatetic Association’s Attempt to Block Access to Alternative Nutrition (Forbes article)

As a Marine, health enthusiast, Paramedic and Natural Chef (health and wellness emphasis) I am appalled by the actions of this group. The very idea that you would limit an individuals right to speak openly and to claim yourself as the sole provider of health related nutritional information for the “express purpose of limiting market competition for its Registered Dietitian members” is baffling (quote from the article posted below).

“Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food” – Hippocrates

Nutrition is health. Hippocrates knew it and so did Thomas Edison.

“The doctor of the future will give no medicine, but will interest her or his patients in the care of the human frame, in a proper diet, and in the cause and prevention of disease.” – Thomas Edison

Nutrition is extremely important. I practice, emphasize and speak of health and wellness through natural foods (holistic/alternative nutrition) and physical fitness. I have found this to be extremely beneficial. My body feels healthy and strong. I share this information on this blog and also with friends and co workers. Many of which come to me for advice. If the American Dietetic Association had their way what I have been doing would potentially be criminal.

We as a nation are facing an obesity epidemic that has never before been seen. This epidemic has happened while on the watch of the American Diatetic Association. We must allow for competing ideas on nutrition in order to combat this trend. The holistic (alternative) nutrition world needs to band together and form a coalition with standards and licensure to ensure that they are able to be taken seriously in the publics eye.

Remember: Your health is your responsibility.

Without further ado here is the article.

Exclusive Leaked Documents: American Dietetic Association is Intentionally Using State Legislatures to Block Alternative Nutrition Providers and Restrict Free Speech

I found this article through the Foundation Fitness Facebook page.

Muscle Confusion

The theory that an individual requires large amounts of different exercises in order to continue to gain strength and skill is a fallacy.  In truth the body only requires a few core exercises along with a skillyfully planned manipulation of three variables.  weight, density, volume.

Weight is varied through different means, but typically through a cycling of the weights from light to heavy and back again.  Each time reaching a peak or personal best, then lowering the weight and working your way back up again past the  initial PR.  

Density is varied through how quickly you work through a workout.  Density is varied through the amount of time you rest between workouts.

Volume is how many times you list a particular weight.  

Muscle confusion does not require a constant changing of exercises.  All this does is ensure that you become semi-good at lots of things.  If your goal is greater strength you should focus on a few exercises and vary them as above.  

Example:

I love kettlebells.  It is difficult to vary the weight of a kettlebell when there are such large jumps between.  Therefore I vary density and volume.  On a typical three day a week workout plan you may have a heavy, light and medium day.  All days use the same weight kettlebell, however the volume of the exercise changes.  Therefore if I am doing kettlebell clean and presses, my heavy day will be 75 presses/side total, my light day will be 30, and my medium day will be 50.  These are one through russian ladders as pavel tsatsouline discusses in his book Enter The Kettlebell.  Once i work up to the overall numbers I then attempt to condense those movements into a shorter period of time.  Therefore, constantly changing density and volume.

If I am doing a free weight exercise you may follow the above principles, however you also have the ability to change the weight regularly.  This is done through cycling your workout.  Starting out light and working to a PR, then dropping the weight and working back up to a new PR.  Pavel also discusses this in Power to the People.  

So, in truth, you don’t need a thousand exercises fixing each tiny little thing that is wrong with your body.  You need a few great exercises that work your entire body.  You also don’t need to worry about “muscle confusion” as the trainers attempt to sell you their product.

Just pick a few good exercises and work hard on them.  Progress will show up.

My exercises that I have chosen are the deadlift, kettlebell clean and press, swings, snatches and Turkish Getups.  

Check out the links at the top of this page for more information on these exercises and cycling of your workout.  There is also a lot of info about food and wellness.

32kg (70lb) kettlebell

Welcome to the family.
Time to get back to work.

2015/01/img_1050.jpg

Big Push and a Big Pull: Fitness made simple

Fitness programs should be simple and goal oriented.  Even if the goal is general fitness.  My goal is heavy presses, heavy deadlift, heavy getup and a high level of cardio.  I will achieve this goal through a big push and a big pull day.

A big push and a big pull works the entire body.  Heavy presses, coupled with a heavy deadlift will work your body quickly and efficiently.  Add in some turkish getups as well as some swings and snatches and you can have an entire workout in short order.  Modern day fitness programs rely on constantly changing the workout.  Some modern day fitness instructors rely on the ignorance of their client in order to fleece their gold from their clients.  Our “modern” age would have us believe that we require an expert for everything.  Fitness is not this way.  

If you want to get stronger, lift heavier things more often.

If you want to lose fat, eat healthy and real food, less of it, once a day if possible, lift heavy and perform high intensity cardio…and prioritize sleep.

The human body moves in two major ways.  Through a big push and a big pull.  As individuals we either pick things up from the ground or put things overhead.  Two movements cover the basis of movement for human strength.  The deadlift works the entire posterior chain as well as the core in particular.  The press covers the rest of the body.  In addition to these two movements I suggest adding in swings/snatches for high rep high intensity cardio as well as the turkish getup as a great movement to teach the interconnectedness of the human body.

Due to the fact that individuals can only do a few things well at any given time, my workout program has been broken down into two routines covering only 4 days a week.  A big push and a big pull day.

Big Push Day

Kettlebell Turkish Getups x 3 minutes with a focus on irradiation, tension, and form.  More for tension practice and time under the bell.  Only three minutes in order to allow me the full use of my faculties while pressing.

After the getup my focus turns to ladders of kettlebell clean and presses.  Heavy ladders of kettlebell clean and presses in a heavy, light, medium format as described by Pavel Tsatsouline in ‘Enter the Kettlebell’.  Increasing the weight as you become comfortable with the full heavy day of presses.

It sounds simple but remaining focussed during the presses can be tough.  It is important to focus on the correct movement throughout.  

Odd as it may seem, the final presses that I do often feel like my strongest.  This is because the fatigue that begins to set in forces me to use my entire body to press the bell.  By using the entire body I mean that I tense my entire body more thoroughly.  Not kipping or cheating the bell up.

Big Pull Day

Big pull day starts with the deadlift.  There’s a multitude of ways to focus on the deadlift.  I perform sets of 5 in the standard prescribed by Pavel Tsatsouline in ‘Power to the People’.  I will have increase the weight with each workout while cycling the weight overall.  This will allow continuous progress.  Furthermore, I will have a heavy day and a lighter day.  The heavy deadlift day will start with the workout weight for 5.  drop 10% for another 5, then drop another 10% for the duration of sets of 5 until form breaks or most likely to a total of 5 sets.  The light day will consist of the same, but with the last sets not going over 4 sets.  The amount of reps/sets will decrease as the weight increases, peaking with a new PR of 1-3 reps.  At this time I will cycle the workout weights down and then increase once again to progressively heavier lifts.

After this is completed I perform swings or snatches to finish out the day.

The Goal

The goal of my program is to be able to deadlift 400 pounds, press the 106 pound kettlebell with each arm, do a getup with the 106 pound kettlebell, and snatch the 53 pound kettlebell 200 times in 10 minutes. I currently weigh 165 pounds at 5’10.

The Plan

For the next few months It is my intention to bring my deadlift up to a 300 pound range for sets of 5 as well as to become comfortable with the 70 pound kettlebell.  At that point I will increase the press to the 88 pound kettlebell and work on the 106 pound kettlebell until next December while bringing the deadlift to the 400 pound range.  

While I work on the 70 pound press and until I get the deadlift up to the 300 pound range I am going to have a 5 day workout program.  Monday, Wednesday, and Friday will be dedicated to pushes.  Tuesday and Thursday’s are dedicated to the pull.

My 4 day program is as follows.

Monday – getup and “heavy” presses (upward of 5 sets of russian ladders to 5, 75 total presses/side)

Tuesday – “light” deadlift and swings

Wednesday – off day

Thursday – getup and “medium or light” presses (5 sets of russian ladders to 3 or 4, 30 or 50 presses/side depending on how I feel)  Will lean towards medium presses.

Friday – “heavy” deadlift and snatches

It is my belief that this program will allow me to reach a high level of strength and general fitness over the next year by applying everything that I have learned in terms of fitness and nutrition.  

Check out the top of the page in order to find quick links to previous articles.  There is lots of information about cycling of your workout and nutrition.

Secondary Research Guide for Health and Wellness

This is a list of the resources that I tend to use when doing my research.  I thought that it might be useful for all of you in your studies.  It’s probably best to just click and get the 1 page .pdf version linked below.  Otherwise enjoy scrolling through the blog.  Happy researching.

Secondary Research Guide for Health and Wellness.pdf

 

Consult Reference Librarian


Reference Books

– Dictionaries

Blacks Agricultural Dictionary

Food and Fitness: a Dictionary of Diet and Exercise 

Nutrition and Well-Being A to Z

Green Health: An A-to-Z Guide

Taylor’s Dictionary for Gardeners

– Encyclopedias

Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine

Encyclopedia of Healing Foods

Sports, Exercise, and Fitness

Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine

Encyclopedia of Organic, Sustainable, and Local Food

 

Indices and Abstracts

AGECON Search

AGRICOLA

AGRIS

Agricultural Index

AMED

BIOSIS

CINAHL

Consumer Health Complete

Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition

JSTOR

Global Plants

Medline

Natural and Alternative Treatments

Natural Standard

PUBMED

 

Journals

– Scholarly

American Journal of Preventative Medicine

Explore – The journal of Science and Healing

Integrative Medicine: A Clinician’s Journal

International Journal of Naturopathic Medicine

Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine

Journal of the American Dietetic Association

Journal of Applied Horticulture

Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

Journal of Sustainable Agriculture

Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture

Naturopathy Digest

Natural Medicine Journal

Primary Care: Clinics in Office Practice

Strength and Conditioning Journal

– Practitioner

Muscle and Performance

Natural Practitioner

Organic Gardening

Prevention

 

Government Documents

USA.gov

Center for Disease Control

Department of Agriculture

Department of Health and Human Services

Food and Drug Administration

National Agricultural Library

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

National Institutes of Health

Texas Department of Agriculture

United States Department of Agriculture

 

Websites

Nabne.org

Naturalmedicinejournal.com

Naturopathic.org

ndnr.com

 

Professional Organizations

American Association of Naturopathic Physicians

National Association of Sports and Physical Education

Texas Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association

 

Key Words

Prevention

Holistic Nutrition

Natural/Organic Food 

Naturopathic Medicine

Physical Fitness

Strength and Conditioning

Weight TrainingWellness

 

Style Sheet

American Medical Association

Council of Science Editors

The Deadlift

One of the greatest exercises available to you is the deadlift.  This exercise requires the individual to lift a static weight upwards off of the ground until you are standing.  This exercise works an astonishing amount of muscle group in the body.  In fact the only portion of the body that is not sufficiently worked in this exercise are the pressing muscles, these muscles are worked through a pressing movement which should be incorporated into your exercise routine.  

While many claim the squat as the king of exercises I would disagree.  The deadlift is the true measure of strength and has great usefullness.  The ability to pick an item up off of the ground while using the entire body is both functional and a great test of strength.  Everyone must pick things up. It is rare that one must hold an item on ones shoulder and simply bend ones legs.

The deadlift is an extremely safe exercise that may be performed without a spotter as well.  This is extremely important when choosing exercises.  Proper form is critical to the health of the body and the ability to perform this exercise without a spotter increases the opportunities for performing the exercise.  It is not the weight of the lift that is dangerous it is the form of the lifter that causes injury.  Therefore you should always maintain tension throughout your body during the lift.  

The deadlift strengthens the legs and the entire posterior chain.  The deadlift has the ability to build massive backs with regular practice.

An old school deadlift workout might consist of 5 sets of 5 for size.  Other options are two sets of 5 with a weight that is 90% of your max on the first and the second being 80% of your max for strength.  You may also work your deadlift through a ladder routine as well.  In order to achieve “muscle confusion” you must change up the intensity of rep ranges of your exercises not the exercise itself. However you should maintain  consistent program for at least 4 months to maximize the potential of that program.

Therefore you should buy an olympic weight set and start deadlifting.  You’ll be happier because of it.  I know that I am.

Things to remember when deadlifting.

1. Approach the bar with the intention of completing the lift.

2. Sit backwards into a chair instead of bending your knees as in a squat.  Tense your body as you move into your starting position.

3. Maintain a straight back and the natural arch in your back.  Keep your head up.

4. Lock your shoulders into place.

5. Grip the bar with straight arms.

6. Pull the bar from the floor by pushing with your feet.

7. Stay on your heals as you lift and let your arms hang.  Do not pull with your arms.

8. Stand up straight, do not hyperextend your back.

9. Let the bar and yourself move quickly to the ground by sitting back in order to get your knees out of the way.  The lift ends at the top of the movement.  Your risk of injury increases greatly when lowering the bar slowly.